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Canadian Rockies Winter Vacations: Six great activities

Posted by The Mountain Man, Monday, September 6th, 2010 at 10:54 am

Well, my friends, winter in the Canadian Rockies is steadily approaching, and that’s got me thinking of some of my favorite winter activities, and places for them in the Rockies.

Canmore, Alberta is high on my list of places to go when the snow starts to fly. You’ve got awesome ski resorts within short driving distance, dog sledding, snowshoeing, and some of the best nordic skiing paths you’ll find anywhere, along with lots of other winter activities.

The Canadian Rockies winter is breathtaking, and not just because of the cold temps.

You’ll find Canmore well-situated for taking advantage of the the Canadian Rockies’ great outdoors, sitting basically at the crossroads of Kananaskis Country and Banff National Park.

Here are five of the many activities you can enjoy in this winter wonderland.
  1. Ice Walking: Hike over a sheet of natural that covers the bottom of a breathe-taking canyon. Sounds like a slippery proposition? Don’t worry, you’ll be wearing ice cleats that’ll give you a solid on the ice as you explore the Pictographs, Grotto Canyon, and the Ice Falls. The ice walk only takes about 1.5 to 2 hours total time, but they’re two hours you’re not likely to forget anytime soon. I’d recommend doing this trip with a guide, to get the best out of it and to stay safe.
  2. Ice Climbing: Does this sound like something you couldn’t possibly do? Think again. Canmore is a great place for beginners to test the (frozen) waters of this extreme sport. Take a beginners ice climbing course and you’ll learn the “ropes” with professional guide instructors who will help you do it safely. One of a kind locations, and an experience well beyond the ordinary await you.
  3. Snowshoe Walks: To snowshoe in Canmore, you won’t need to learn any new skills. Just strap on the shoes and go for a walk. In just a short time after leaving Canmore, you can be out enjoying the winter peace and quiet, truly enjoying nature’s beauty. Guided snowshoe tours can help you discover Canmore’s winter wildlife where, if you’re a little lucky, you can follow the tracks of the wolf, coyote or lynx.
  4. Cross Country Skiing: Cross Country or Nordic skiing is one of the best known winter activities in the Canmore area. Canmore served as host community for cross country and biathlon competitions during the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics. The Nordic Centre in Canmore continues hosting competitive ski events and provides an incredible facility for beginners and other recreational skiers to enjoy world class facilities, track set trails and snowmaking. A number of wilderness areas around Canmore offer track set systems.
  5. Dog Sledding: In Canmore, you’ll find three world-class outfitters offering daily trips of varying lengths in what is known to be one of the most terrific natural settings in the Canadian Rockies, dog sledding is an very popular vacation activity. Trips vary in length, and certainly go well beyond the very soft adventure that they can also be.
  6. Skiing and Snowboarding: When it comes to skiing and snowboarding in the Canadian Rockies, Canmore is well known for four great ski areas that run from world class slopes to great locals skiing areas.
  • Sunshine Village – Just 20 minutes from Canmore, the Sunshine high-speed gondola zips skiers up to the village at 7,000 feet. From here, numerous high-speed quads spread out all over this fabulous ski area – most of the rides and runs will keep you above treeline so you’ll get great views on top of great riding.
  • Mt. Norquay –Just  15 minutes from Canmore, the Mt. Norquay is well known as a place for locals to run out and get some runs on a whim. You can enjoy it too on your vacation. Norquay’s got plenty to offer skiers and snowboarders all day long, and the only night skiing in the area every Friday.
  • Lake Louise –Only  an hour after leaving Canmore, you can be at the top of Lake Louise ski resort, looking down into the Bow Valley and preparing for an epic day of skiing or snowboarding.
  • Nakiska – About a 40-minute drive from Canmore into Kananaskis Country, Nakiska offers runs for various ability levels, with family cruisers, fun glades, and steep corduroy groomers to race down (evoking the 1988 Olympics, perhaps – Nakiska hosted the downhill events).

The Canadian Rockies in September, and, of course, dogs

Posted by The Mountain Man, Thursday, September 2nd, 2010 at 6:25 pm

Dogs and weather seem to be the subject of most Frequently Asked Question about the Canadian Rockies. The weather, well now that’s just practical, and smart. The weather in the Canadian Rockies is constantly changing, and, especially at high elevations, it’s been known to snow for almost no good reason, any time of year.

Wild wolf in Banff National Park

That's not your dog! That's a wild wolf, just one reason to keep your dog on-leash. Photo by John Marriott.

Dogs of course, are man’s best friend. Nothing reminds me of this more than the number of emails we get asking us questions about dogs, or all the times I get woken up by my dog at 5 am on a Saturday, and don’t get mad. Anyway, here are this week’s dog and weather questions:

From M. Rogers:

What are the rules for traveling and camping with pet dogs in the parks.

and B. Fread asks:

What is the weather like in Mid September in this area?
Are most of the attractions of this area still opened?

Regarding the first question, the first thing you need to know is: Bring a leash. The second? Bring a spare leash. Except for a couple dog parks, there aren’t many places in the Canadian Rockies parks, such as Jasper or Banff, where you’re dogs are allowed to roam without being tethered to their owner. This isn’t so bad if you consider that just south of the border, in Glacier National Park, dogs are hardly even allowed on leash… Anyway, you can get more from this Canadian Rockies dog FAQ.

As far as the weather in September, I’ll start out with the facts: In September, the highs in the Canadian Rockies (very generally) are around 16 C (60 F), with lows around 3 C (37 F). Beyond the facts: as I mentioned, the weather here is famously unpredictable, with snow storms dumping on you out of nowhere, especially in the high elevations.

But what does this mean to you? Mainly, be prepared. Most likely, the trails will be hike-able, especially in lower elevations. But they might not be if all you brought were flip flops, shorts and a T-shirt. Even if the worst weather does come, you can find plenty to do here. The Banff Gondola, for instance, is open year-round. And if nothing else, you’ll find some of the world’s best restaurants and shopping in the Canadian Rockies towns.

A tale of mystery and romance in Lake Louise

Posted by The Mountain Man, Friday, August 27th, 2010 at 4:35 pm

This is one of the more interesting and fun Canadian Rockies questions the old Mountain Man has gotten in a

while. It’s regarding Lake Louise, and, I believe, the Chateau Lake Louise:

My wife and I are leaving tomorrow morning for a 1 week trip to Banff and Lake Louise. My Grandparents met at Lake Louise while working there in the early 1920′s. I would like to know what Lodge is the oldest or original to the lake as that is most likely to be the one my Grandmother worked at. I can’t seem to find anything online that would give me that info.

Thank you

Rod Friesen

The Chateau on Lake Louise is certain to have some romantic history.

Just to make sure I had my facts straight, I made a quick call to the friendly folks at Parks Canada, who assured me that in fact, the Chateau Lake Louise would have been around during the 1920s. Lodging of one sort or another has existed on the site since the late 1800′s. The oldest section of the Chateau Lake Louise still standing at this time is the Painter Wing, built in 1913. There is also the Barrot Wing, built in 1925, one year after the Rattenbury Wing burnt down.

The age is one thing that makes me think your grandparents may have met at the Chateau Lake Louise. The other is that, even as a Mountain Man, I have to admit that the Chateau is one of the most romantic places on earth. A couple of young folks meeting their for the first time are bound to produce grand kids some day.

Hope this helps out with your search. Enjoy the Canadian Rockies, and write in if you find out any more!

Reader Reviews (and rips) Jasper’s Miss Italia

Posted by The Mountain Man, Tuesday, August 24th, 2010 at 2:48 pm

Jasper, Alberta

Normally I, as someone who calls the Canadian Rockies home, and spends a lot of time in Canmore, Banff and Jasper, am used to hearing nothing but good stuff about our local restaurants. So I was somewhat taken aback by what one reader sent us on Jasper’s Miss Italia:

On holiday from the UK and visited Jasper with my family. We ate at “Miss Italia” over a week ago and was probably one of the worst meals we ever experienced, thus avoided paying any service charge. It was apparent that things weren’t cooked fresh! The pasta was basically over-cooked mush and the pasta sauces lacked any flavor. My wife had the pasta with meatballs and this so bad, she could only take one taste of it – tried it myself and have tasted better from a can. I really could of cooked something better in 5 mins. Really very dreadful and meals cooked with no passion and not mention expensive. Avoid!

Roger Johnson

Horsham Sussex

Yowch! Roger was apparently not very happy with Miss Italia, and from surfing around a bit on the old internet, I’ve seen that there have been similar complaints. Still, you never know, and we’d willing to hear from readers who have other opinions, positive or no, on this and any other restaurant. Just contact us with your review, and we’ll let your voice (and stomach) be heard.

Letting your Dog Run Free in Jasper

Posted by The Mountain Man, Monday, August 9th, 2010 at 2:55 pm

Jasper offers great vacation opportunities for dogs and their humans.

Today’s question comes from Jessica W.

Hi! I read about how pets must be on a leash at all times. Are there any off-leash parks/areas for dogs anywhere in or near Jasper?

Thanks,

Jessica

Jessica, we recently spoke with Thea Mitchell of Parks Canada, and asked her this very question. While dogs are required to be leashed on trails in the park, there is a great dog park you can take them to in the town of Jasper, where they can run wild and free. It’s Jasper’s municipal dog park, located on Pyramid Lake Road beside the Jasper Aquatic Centre and across from the Jasper Yellowhead Museum and Archives.

For more information on vacationing here with your dog, check out this guide to vacationing in Jasper with a dog.

Hope that helps!

Getting Canadian Rockies Vacation Advice from the Experts

Posted by The Mountain Man, Friday, August 6th, 2010 at 5:22 pm

The Canadian Rockies are a big, wide region. Consider that Banff National Park covers almost 7,000 square km, Jasper National Park another 10,000 and Kananaskis Country another 4,200 or so. That alone is more than 21,000 square km, almost exactly the size of New Jersey, and it’s leaving out Waterton Lakes, the Yoho and other great Canadian Rockies destinations.

Jasper and the Canadian Rockies offer much to see. Get some expert advice!

The fact is that no one person can cover enough of the Canadian Rockies in a life time to be an expert on the entire place. Which is why over at Rockies.com they’ve been interviewing various experts on the Canadian Rockies, getting the advantage of several lifetimes worth of experience to give you some great info, with their Rockies Insiders section.

Here’s are 5 great interviews they’ve done in the last few weeks:

1. Photography: Advice on improving your Canadian Rockies photography, and places to shoot (your camera) in Canadian Rockies with Mike Grandmaison. Grandmaison is a long time pro photographer who has shot an entire book about the Canadian Rockies.

2. Icefields Parkway: A tour of the famous Icefields Parkway with Brad White. Brad’s a mountain man, if I’ve ever heard of one. He’s lived in Banff for 50 years, and worked for Parks Canada for 28 of those. His most recent work finds him as Banff’s Mountain Safety Program Specialist, doing Mountain Rescue and Avalanche forecasting and control.

3. Banff Vacation Tips: Marc Pinel, founder of the Grand Nature Club, a Banff-based hiking club offer his Banff hiking tips as well as some general Banff vacation information from him.

4. Jasper Best of: Peter Amann offered up his picks for some of the best places to see in Jasper National Park. Amann has been has been the president of the Jasper section of the Alpine Club, Canada’s official mountaineering organization, since 1992, and is a long-time Jasper tour guide.

5. Jasper with Parks Canada: Parks Canada representative Thea Mitchell give her take on what to do with children in Jasper National Park, and some great ways to get prepared for your first backpacking trip in Jasper.

Good stuff so far, and they’ve got plans to do a lot more, so stay tuned. I know I will be!

Canadian Rockies Weather: August or September Vacation?

Posted by The Mountain Man, Monday, July 26th, 2010 at 3:52 pm

In my work as the Canadian Rockies question answerer in chief, I find the vast majority of questions people have about Canmore, Jasper, Banff and the rest of the Canadian Rockies center around two main topic. Weather and their dogs. I like that.

Banff National Park offers great hiking, with the warmest weather in July and August.

It shows vacationers to the Canadian Rockies have both a practical and sentimental side.

Anyway, today’s question deals with the first category: weather.

I am planning on visiting the Canadian Rockies next year. I am trying to decide between August and September. I like the warmer weather and longer days in August. I am afriad September may be too cool. On the other hand, is August busy with tourists? Possibly September may be less busy? Should I stay away from August?

It’s a good question. The first thing you should know is that these factors are variable. The weather in the Canadian Rockies can change abruptly. You could happen to come on some cold August days, or some warm September days. Also, you never know with tourism, numbers can change anytime. So I’ll give you the official estimates first.

In August, the highs tend to hover around 22 C (71 F), with lows all the way down to 7 C (44.6 F).

In September, the highs are around 16 C (60 F), with lows around 3 C (37 F).

These are the averages for the town of Banff, Alberta. The temperatures will be much cooler when you reach higher elevations.

Here’s my opinion on the original question. August or September? If you want to have the best chance of getting out and seeing the park, I would come in August. Yes, you may have to deal with more people in the parks, but you can try to buffer that by visiting mid-week. If you visit in September though, there is a much great chance that a trail you had planned on visiting in higher altitudes may already have a blanket of snow on it. Also, if you really want to avoid the crowds, talk to Parks Canada officials about where you might some of the less busy trails.

Canoeing Banff: From Castle Junction to Banff

Posted by The Mountain Man, Wednesday, June 23rd, 2010 at 7:14 pm

The mountain man isn’t always the most graceful traveler in the Canadian Rockies. I’ve fallen off of rafts, crashed on my skis, gone over the handlebars on my mountain bike, and even fell of a cliff on a golf cart one time.

Canoeing is a great way to explore the Canadian Rockies.

So I naturally gravitate toward canoeing. Not that this is easier, or always completely safe and adrenaline free. The rivers of the Rockies can move fast and have plenty of rapids. But all in all, canoeing in the Canadian Rockies can be a great way to relax, kickback and enjoy some of Banff National Park‘s great scenery.

Before heading out on your canoe, be sure to scope out Banff and the weather with the free Banff webcam. Afterward, come back to town for great restaurants, hotels and brewpubs. Below you’ll find a guide to one of my favorite Banff canoe trips.

Castle Junction to Banff

This portion of Alberta’s Bow River lies on the east side of the Trans-Canada Highway and the west side of the Canadian Pacific Railway line and Highway 1A (Bow Valley Parkway). The Bow River runs steadily down the valley, with islands and side channels you’ll want give yourself time to explore. There are plenty of riffles and Class 1 rapids, along with one Class 3 rapid at Redearth Creek, some tight corners, sweepers and logjams, that will keep it interesting. Be sure to take care when canoeing this section.

Put in at the parking lot below the bridge over the Bow River at Castle Junction. After 6km of river you’ll reach Johnston Creek, flowing in from river left. On the downstream side of Johnston Creek you’ll find a sign for a backcountry campsite. Another 3km past Johnston Creek, a right bend in the river leads you towards the Trans-Canada Highway and the Castle Mountain Viewpoint.

This landmark indicates you are nearing Redearth Creek Rapids. As you paddle below the viewpoint, the river turns left, away from the highway. In just a few hundred metres, the river turns sharply right into the area of Redearth Creek Rapids. Rated Class 3, these rapids are a long section of fast water moving over rocks. The waves are non-stop, getting larger as you approach the end. Man a canoe has capsized or swamped here, but proper scouting and safety procedures, this rapid can be run by experienced canoeists.

If you have any doubts, portage the rapid. There is no marked portage route. But from the top of the rapid on river right, you can make your way along the shore to where Redearth Creek enters the Bow River. From there, wade across the creek and carry your canoe along the riverside trail to the end of the rapids.

A few km below Redearth Creek, the river becomes convoluted. It may not be obvious, but the river here branches into two or three channels. This is a risky section, with tight corners, endless sweepers and dangerous logjams. Pay attention and be safe!

The large gravel fan at the Wolverine Creek entrance on river right, is where you can finally rest a little, knowing the hardest parts are behind you. Another 5.5 km brings you back to the Trans-Canada Highway. This is a good place to take out as there is a gate through the fence to access a roadside parking area off the westbound lane of the highway.

Another 0.5 km brings you to the Trans-Canada Highway bridge over the Bow River. Careful going under the bridge as there are several sweepers on the left side of the river. From it’s a pleasant, 1.5 – 2 hour paddle to Banff. The river is broad and calm, allowing beautiful views of the lower Bow Valley. Take out at the canoe docks, at the junction of the Bow River and Echo Creek. Do not paddle past the canoe docks as Bow Falls is just around the corner.

Distance: 32 km (takes about 5 – 6 hours)

Level: intermediate

Canadian Rockies Mountain Biking: Jasper Trails

Posted by The Mountain Man, Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010 at 6:36 pm

Jasper National Park is huge. It covers some of the best terrain in the Canadian Rockies, and seeing it all on a vacation, even in a lifetime, is pretty much impossible. But if you want to get out and see a huge part of this beautiful country, you should try mountain biking Jasper.

You’ll get around faster and cover more area than you would on foot, but enjoy a more quiet, natural experience than you would from your car.

Below you’ll find a selection of Jasper mountain bike trails. To see Jasper, live, check out the Jasper webcam. Also, you may want to visit this Rockies biking blog.

Jacques Lake

Distance: 13 km

Begin at Medecine Lake’s south end, at the Beaver Lake picnic area, and follow a lushly vegetated valley 5 km to the first Summit Lake. The going is pretty flat up to Beaver Lake, making for an easy ride suitable for just about anyone. The going to Jacques Lake can be somewhat difficult due to mud, if there’s been lots of rain or recent snowmelt.

Fryatt Trail

Distance: 10 km

Jump on this bike trail 2 km up the Geraldine Fire Road at the Fryatt Valley parking lot. The trail cuts through a somewhat thick forest at a low elevation for the first 8.2 km, the ride includes several creek crossings. From the lower Fryatt campsite, you can hike another 10 km to the upper Fryatt Valley on foot.

Whirlpool Fire Road

Distance: 11.5 km

Driving down Hwy. 93A catch the Moab Lake turnoff and go to the Moab Lake parking lot. From there it is 8.5 km to the end of the fire road. You can hike or bike another 3 km from here to Tie Camp on foot.

Snake Indian Falls

Distance: 48 km

Drive down Celestine Lake Road to the Celestine Lake parking area where the North Boundary Trail begins. A nicely-graded gravel road goes from here for 22 km to Snake Indian Falls. Just 1 kilometre past the falls, the road becomes a heavily-trafficed trail to the Willow Creek area and the Rock Lake exit.

Fortress Lake Trail

Distance: 25 km

This ride begins at Sunwapta falls and following an old fire road. The trail is great for the first 16k, all the way to the Athabasca Crossing suspension bridge. After the bridge the biking gets pretty rough, but it is possible hike another 9 km to Fortress Lake.

Here’s are 7 Rules of the Road for mountain biking in Jasper, or anywhere, really:

  1. Plan it, darn it! Know your equipment, be honest about your abilities, and check up on the riding trail, preferably with a park ranger. Prepare accordingly. A little planning is often the difference between a horrible day and an awesome day.
  2. Stay in Control. Don’t go faster, or attempt terrain that you know you can’t handle. Always be attentive and mind bicycle regulations and recommendations.
  3. Leave no trace. It’s everyone’s park, so treat it with respect by following a few simple rules. Stay on maintained  trails and don’t create new ones. Pack out what you pack in, and bonus points if you pack out some other jerk’s discarded rubbish.
  4. Don’t scare the wildlife. You don’t like it when someone sneaks up on you, and neither do wild animals. Usually, the repercussions of doing this with a bear are worse though. Avoid unannounced approaches, a sudden movements, or a loud a noises. These actions can be dangerous for you, others, and wildlife. Give wildlife space and time to adjust to you, and make some noise as you come down the trail.
  5. Ride open trails only. Respect the trail and avoid areas which are closed to bikes. They are closed for a reason. Seriously, no one is trying to hide trails from you just to ruin your vacation. Also, remember that the way you ride will influence Parks Canada trail management decisions and policies.
  6. Always yield the trail. Make your approach known well in advance. A greeting, a bell or some other noise is basic politeness; don’t startle others. Show respect when passing by, slowing to a walking pace or, if need be, stopping. Anticipate trail users around corners and in blind spots.
  7. Put a lid on it! Always wear a helmet.

Keep trails open by setting a good example of environmentally sound and socially responsible off-road cycling.

Jasper National Park Mountain Biking Trails

Posted by The Mountain Man, Tuesday, June 22nd, 2010 at 4:31 pm

One thing about vacationing in the Canadian Rockies: you’ll never run out of outdoor activities to do. Rafting, mountain biking, climbing, fishing, horseback riding, hiking, it goes on and on when you find yourself in Jasper National Park, Banff National Park or Kananaskis Country.

Mountain biking in the Canadian Rockies offers great views with a good dose of exercise.

If you want to get out and see a whole lot of the Canadian Rockies and get some exercise, try a mountain biking tour in Jasper. It’s fun, you’ll get some adrenaline, exercise and great sight seeing.

Below you’ll find a guide to  a few of Japser’s mountain biking trails. Check out conditions in and around Jasper with the free, live Jasper webcam. Also, you may want to check out this Rockies biking blog.

Athabasca River Trail

This ride begins at the Old Fort Point trail, and goes behind the beautiful golf course at The Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge. The first 12 km have some solid uphill segments that’ll get your blood flowing. Remember, no bikes between the first and fifth bridges on the self-guided trail at Maligne Canyon. Avoid this by riding down Maligne Road to the Fifth Bridge turnoff 3 km below. Cross the bridge and pedal to Trail #7 on the far side. Take a left to Sixth Bridge and continue along the trail runs beside the Athabasca River to Old Fort Point, or head back to Jasper along Highway 16.

Distance: 23 km

Level: Beginner to Intermediate

The Mina-Riley Lake Loop

Trail guide: Start at the parking lot opposite Japser’s Aquatic Center. The trail climbs steeply to the left, then intersects with the Cabin Lake fire road. Cross the road and pedal past a big pond continuing on to Mina Lake. At about 3.5km from the lake a marked trail leads down a steep hill to Riley Lake. Turn around at the intersection with trail #6 (no bikes allowed on 6). Head back using the main trail by turning left onto the fire road at km 7. A right turn onto the paved Pyramid Lake Road will lead you back down to Jasper.

Distance: 9 km

Level: Intermediate to Advanced

Saturday Night Loop

Trail guide: The trail starts on the west side of Jasper just before The Cabin Creek West subdivision. Take the trail leading from the parking lot on the left. The trail takes you uphill, following a low ridge with nice views of the Athabasca and Miette Valleys.After  From High Lakes to Saturday Night Lake you’ll find swampy sections, but from there to Cabin Lake is easy riding.  After Cabin Lake, ride along the fire road to the intersection with Pyramid Lake Road and take a right to return to Jasper.

Distance: 27.4 km

Level: Advanced

The Overlander Trail

You’ll find the trailhead 20 km east of Jasper on Hwy 16. Look for the trailhead at the second parking lot when the highway crosses the Athabasca River. The trail parallels the river, which makes for great views. Close to the end of this trail you turn down a right-hand fork and cross a small creek (don’t worry, there’s a bridge). Continue on the edge of the river to the junction of the Maligne and Athabasca rivers at Sixth Bridge picnic area.

Distance: 14 km

Level: Beginner to Intermediate

Here’s are 7 Rules of the Road for mountain biking in Jasper, or anywhere, really:

  1. Don’t scare the wildlife. You don’t like it when someone sneaks up on you, and neither do wild animals. Usually, the repercussions of doing this with a bear are worse though. Avoid unannounced approaches, a sudden movements, or a loud a noises. These actions can be dangerous for you, others, and wildlife. Give wildlife space and time to adjust to you, and make some noise as you come down the trail.
  2. Plan it, darn it! Know your equipment, be honest about your abilities, and check up on the riding trail, preferably with a park ranger. Prepare accordingly. A little planning is often the difference between a horrible day and an awesome day.
  3. Stay in Control. Don’t go faster, or attempt terrain that you know you can’t handle. Always be attentive and mind bicycle regulations and recommendations.
  4. Leave no trace. It’s everyone’s park, so treat it with respect by following a few simple rules. Stay on maintained  trails and don’t create new ones. Pack out what you pack in, and bonus points if you pack out some other jerk’s discarded rubbish.
  5. Ride open trails only. Respect the trail and avoid areas which are closed to bikes. They are closed for a reason. Seriously, no one is trying to hide trails from you just to ruin your vacation. Also, remember that the way you ride will influence Parks Canada trail management decisions and policies.
  6. Always yield the trail. Make your approach known well in advance. A greeting, a bell or some other noise is basic politeness; don’t startle others. Show respect when passing by, slowing to a walking pace or, if need be, stopping. Anticipate trail users around corners and in blind spots.
  7. Put a lid on it! Always wear a helmet.

Keep trails open by setting a good example of environmentally sound and socially responsible off-road cycling.

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